Wednesday, December 02, 2015

That was some windsday!

A couple of weeks ago, we had some wild winds up at the Mesa Lab.   The instruments up on the roof of the building recorded a peak gust of 94 mph!

Notice how the sustained winds (in red) were pretty similar for the last 3 events while the peak winds (in blue) varied much more widely?

The frequent high winds rattle and stress the windows.  The larger ones are prone to cracking and breaking.  My neighbor noticed the crack in his office window before the wind incident of November 18, 2015.

(The window in the mirror image office across the hall from this one cracked last spring.)

It isn't every day that you can see a paneless opening in your office building.

It took three guys on the inside and one guy on the outside to replace the window.

Some view!

5 comments:

  1. Anonymous06:59

    Fascinating as always....

    The window replacement story reminds me of having the window replaced in my 11th story office years ago. Fairly small space.

    As it turned out I was too uncomfortable about the big opening (which came down to about knee level) to even be in the room. It just seemed like it would be so easy to fall out......

    Ceci

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  2. Anonymous14:05

    I read about your desire for an Issey Miyake pattern from the 80s on another post. How do I contact you outside this reply form.
    Vancouver Barbara

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    Replies
    1. badmomgoodmom at gmail dot com

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  3. We decided it wasnt safe to bike that day so we waited for the bus... but since my little bikes every day we didn't know what time the bus came. We ended up outside in that crazy wind for longer than it usually takes to bike to school. In the meantime our giant grill blew into the middle of the yard and tipped over. Glad to hear the Boulder wind speed. I checked NREL and it was 102 or so.

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  4. Rollins Pass is one of the windiest places in North America. It's 11,660'--but surrounded by 13,000'-14,000' peaks. The air dammed up against the continental divide finds relief through Rollins Pass, but speeds up considerably.

    Speeds of > 200 mph are not uncommon there. The downstream areas below Rollins Pass, such as Golden, NREL and south Boulder, also experience high winds speeds of > 100 mph.

    It's no accident that the experimental windmills site of NREL is located there!

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